The Brellis House

 

Anna, damn ‘er: Anadama Bread

Posted on January 27th, 2013 by Dan

After long wait and much anticipation, I am now the proud owner of The Bread Baker’s Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread. by Peter Reinhart. I’ve now read through the introduction sections and have gotten to the formula (recipe) sections. Since he begins with the pre-ferments, I’ll skip ahead to bread number one as I begin my quest to bake all the breads in this book. I’ve already learned so much from the introductory chapters on shaping and calculating ingredient weights for recipes, not to mention the all the science behind creating and baking ‘world class bread’.

anadama-bread-sliced

I may not tackle each bread in the order given, but I certainly hope to try each one at least once in a vegan fashion. This has been a desire of mine for nearly a year and has only grown stronger as I continue to experiment with and refine my own bread baking techniques. Coincidentally, the timing is appropriate to dedicate this challenge to one of my favorite vegan bloggers who, as of the new year, has retired from his blog, VeganDad. His blog was one of the first to provide me with consistently reliable and delicious vegan recipes (very important for a leery vegan) and is so frequently visited on my browser that when you type the letter ‘v’, it’s the first site to appear; it will certainly be missed. So here begins, in honor of VeganDad’s Baking Through the Bread Baker’s Apprentice, Anadama Bread.

anadama-loaf

Frankly, I wasn’t thrilled to start off with a cornmeal loaf bread- give me those french baguettes! But, I decided to start off relatively easy with a simple soaker and pan loaf. The recipe makes 3 pounds, but I made two 2 pound loaves, so I could practice tinkering with the baker’s formula. I was actually really surprised with how much we liked the bread. The molasses was amazing and the crumb was soft and chewy.

Notes:

  1. Make sure to use a 100% vegetable based shortening.
  2. I added an additional 114g of bread flour while kneading to make up for my particular type of molasses.